Rain Season: Charles Mungoshi Speaks Again

Veteran author Charles Mungoshi was on Tuesday discharged from hospital after undergoing successful surgery recently. 

His wife Jessesi yesterday said the writer, who could no longer speak, said his first words after many years.

“He can now speak. I am excited about it. He still has to fully recover, but he is now at home. The doctors said he has to rest for about two weeks before he can talk to many people, so you cannot see him today,” she said

“We hope he will fully recover soon and be able to do many things he used to do. At the moment some of the words are hardly audible, but there is a great improvement in his voice. Before the operation, he could not speak at all.”
Charles Mungoshi 

The author’s condition was a result of fluid that had accumulated in his head and affected his brain, crippling his voice and mobility. He had a shunt inserted last year to drain the fluid to his stomach but it failed to work properly. The surgery done last Thursday was to replace the shunt.

The surgery was made possible after well-wishers and stakeholders in the arts industry responded to a plea for funds from the family. The fundraising campaign began in February and there is still need for more money for post-surgery processes.

Last week, some people spread fake news about the author’s death and the family was disturbed by the evil intention. Many literature followers will be looking forward to Mungoshi’s full recovery and more books from the veteran author. 

Mungoshi was born on 2 December 1947. His works include short stories and novels in both Shona and English. He also writes poetry, but views it as a "mere finger exercise." He has a wide range, including anti-colonial writings and children's books. 

While the colonial regime initially banned his work, he now writes about post-colonial oppression as well. The awards he has won include the Noma Award in 1992 and the Commonwealth Writers Prize (Africa Region) twice in the years 1988 and 1998. 

Two of his novels, one in Shona and the other in English, both published in 1975, won the International PEN Awards. His first Shona novel was Makunun'unu Maodzamoyo followed by the English short collection Some Kinds of Wounds, which was banned by the colonial regime. 

His other Shona novel, Kunyarara Hakusi Kutaura, won several awards and his play Inongova Njakenjake showed his versatility as a writer. He is married to an actress, Jesesi Mungoshi, who played in the Zimbabwean film Neria as Neria. 

He holds an Honorary degree from the University of Zimbabwe. Mungoshi also took part in some of the local Zimbabwean drama series in the late '80s to early '90s. Online Sources

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