Innocence Test: Woman Forced to Kiss Dead Husband

Bulawayo – In some cultures, death is often associates with witchcraft, and the wife is usually the main culprit.

And this what transpired to Felistas Mapeturo when she lost her hubby Jairos Munhundadya.

While others filed through during body viewing, her in-laws made to do the unusual in order to prove her in innocence within the family.

Sources reveal that Jairos died after a short illness and unfortunately she had not informed her in-laws that their son was not feeling well.
Woman Forced to Kiss Dead Body

Upon hearing the news, the in-laws went berserk.

“Mapeturo was banned from attending her husband’s burial. Her in-laws took the body and children ordering her not to follow them to their homestead in Masvingo. She decided to hire a commuter omnibus and followed with her own relatives and friends saying there was no way she could miss her husband’s burial,” a source said.

It is said that upon arrival at the homestead, they were stopped from entering and they slept in the bush. The following morning before burial, a traditional healer was invited to do some rituals.

“Early in the morning, we just sat by the gate and we were only allowed in the yard after the arrival of a traditional healer.

“Body viewing was strictly for close family members and after they had completed, the deceased’s wife was ordered to kiss the corpse and they said it was the only way she could prove her innocence.

“They made it clear that if she had a hand in his death, she was going to die soon after kissing him, but she never did,” the source added, “After the burial, despite having survived, they told her to leave their homestead saying they no longer had any relationship with her.”

Mapeturo in an interview with B-Metro said she was still surprised by the act.

“I had to kiss my dead husband in the coffin to prove that I had not killed him. Up to now I’m still having nightmares,” she said.

Her aunt revealed that they were yet to meet the in-laws and make them pay a fine for what they did to their daughter.

Jairo’s father supports the deed, saying it was a cultural demand.

“It was her husband and in our family if your husband or wife passes away, that is the way you are supposed to bid him/her farewell,” he said. Online Sources/B Metro

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