No Fly Zone: How AirZim is Slowly Flying into Oblivion

Harare – From flying 3 passengers to Johannesburg, appointing an unproven CEO to impounded aircraft. And now being suspended from flying to Europe – AirZim woes are slowly, but surely grounding the once promising airliner.

After failing to pay fees due to the International Air Transport Association (IATA), the airliner was booted out of the world body in 2012.

American General Supplies seized a Boeing 767-200, AirZim largest aircraft over a $1,2 million debts. Soon after paying the debt, the plane was released, but the airline stopped flying the lucrative London route.
How Air Zimbabwe is Flying into Oblivion 

One of the 3 passengers to Johannesburg, a cash cow for most airlines, businessman Shingi Munyeza revealed the pitiful state of affairs via tweeter.

AirZim, which at Independence in 1980 boasted a fleet of 18 planes, is technically insolvent and operating at less than a third of that capacity.

“A rare privilege for me with two other passengers aboard AirZim flight UM9461. Three passengers Harare to Johannesburg on Airbus A320, departure delayed by one hour,” he tweeted.

AirZim inherited 18 planes at Independence in 1980, but today less than 6 are operating, riddled with a $330 million debt.

“A rare privilege for me with two other passengers aboard AirZim flight UM9461. Three passengers Harare to Johannesburg on Airbus A320, departure delayed by one hour,” he tweeted.

News from the European Commission that AirZim has been added to EU Air Safety List does not surprise many.

In April, their five aircrafts were grounded due to persistent technical faults, forcing the airline to hire a plane from South Africa.

“All air carriers from Benin and Mozambique were removed from the EU Air Safety List, while four individual airlines, one each from Nigeria, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Ukraine, and Zimbabwe, were added,” said a press release from the European Commission.

The Commissioner for Transport Violeta Bulc said they will assist all blacklisted carriers.

“I am glad that we are able to take all carriers from Benin and Mozambique out of the air safety list. Their reforms have paid off. This is also a signal to the 16 countries that remain on the list.

Bulc added, “It shows that work and cooperation pays off. The Commission and the European Aviation Safety Agency are ready to assist them and raise the safety standards worldwide.”

Experts say these are clear signs of an ailing entity. – www.tinzwei.com/Online Sources

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