Blood Line: Zimbabwe's Mugabe 'Ready to Die', Nephew

Harare - Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe and his wife Grace are "ready to die for what is correct" and have no intention of stepping down in order to legitimise this week's military coup, his nephew, Patrick Zhuwao, said on Saturday.

Speaking to Reuters from a secret location in South Africa, Zhuwao said Mugabe had hardly slept since the military seized power on Wednesday but his health was otherwise "good".

Robert Gabriel Mugabe born 21 February 1924) is a Zimbabwean revolutionary and politician who has been President of Zimbabwe since 1987. His current status is a matter of dispute following a recent coup d'etat. 

He previously led Zimbabwe as Prime Minister from 1980 to 1987. 

He chaired the Zimbabwe African National Union (ZANU) group from 1975 to 1980, having led its successor political party, the ZANU – Patriotic Front (ZANU–PF), since 1980.
A Child Takes Ride with the Army in Zimbabwe 

Ideologically an African nationalist, during the 1970s and 1980s he identified as a Marxist-Leninist although after the 1990s self-identified only as a socialist; his policies have been described as Mugabeism.

Mugabe was born to a poor Shona family in Kutama, Southern Rhodesia. Following an education at Kutama College and the University of Fort Hare, he worked as a school teacher in Southern Rhodesia, Northern Rhodesia, and Ghana. 

Angered that Southern Rhodesia was a British colony governed by a white minority, Mugabe embraced Marxism and joined African nationalist protests calling for an independent black-led state. After making anti-government comments he was convicted of sedition and imprisoned between 1964 and 1974. 

On release he fled to Mozambique, established his leadership of ZANU, and oversaw ZANU's role in the Rhodesian Bush War, fighting Ian Smith's predominantly white government. 

He reluctantly took part in the peace negotiations brokered by the United Kingdom that resulted in the Lancaster House Agreement. 

The agreement dismantled white minority rule and resulted in the 1980 general election, at which Mugabe led ZANU-PF to victory and became Prime Minister of the newly renamed Zimbabwe. 

Mugabe's administration expanded healthcare and education, and—despite his Marxist rhetoric and professed desire for a socialist society—adhered largely to conservative economic policies. - Online Sources

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